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Civil Rights

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The Smell of Burning Crosses

Journalist Ira Harkey (1918–2006) risked it all when he advocated for James Meredith’s admission to the University of Mississippi as the first African American student in 1962.

Preceded by a legal ...

Shocking the Conscience

Within a few years of its first issue in 1951, Jet, a pocket-sized magazine, became the “bible” for news of the civil rights movement. It was said, only half-jokingly, “If it wasn’t in Jet, it ...

Dream and Legacy

Contributions by Rosa M. Banda, Lakeyta M. Bonnette-Bailey, Donathan L. Brown, Michael L. Clemons, William H. L. Dorsey, Hannah Firdyiwek, Alonzo M. Flowers III, Helen Taylor Greene, William G. Jones, ...

Three Years in Mississippi

On October 1, 1962, James Meredith was the first African American student to enroll at the University of Mississippi. Preceded by violent rioting resulting in two deaths and a lengthy court battle that ...

Mississippi Witness

In June 1964, Neshoba County, Mississippi, provided the setting for one of the most notorious crimes of the civil rights era: the Klan-orchestrated murder of three young voting-rights workers, James Chaney, ...

The Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi

Contributions by Chris Myers Asch, Emilye Crosby, David Cunningham, Jelani Favors, Françoise N. Hamlin, Wesley Hogan, Robert Luckett, Carter Dalton Lyon, Byron D'Andra Orey, Ted Ownby, Joseph T. Reiff, ...

He Slew the Dreamer

Author William Bradford Huie was one of the most celebrated figures of twentieth-century journalism. A pioneer of "checkbook journalism," he sought the truth in controversial stories when the truth was ...

Just Trying to Have School

After the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education ruling, no state fought longer or harder to preserve segregated schools than Mississippi. This massive resistance came to a crashing halt in October 1969 when ...

Desegregating Dixie

By Mark Newman
Categories: History

Mark Newman draws on a vast range of archives and many interviews to uncover for the first time the complex response of African American and white Catholics across the South to desegregation. In the late ...

Aaron Henry

This book reveals why Aaron Henry (1922–1997) should be acknowledged, in the ranks of Fannie Lou Hamer and Medgar Evers, as a truly influential crusader.

Long before many of his contemporaries, he was ...