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Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Series

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Faulkner and His Contemporaries

Although he spent the bulk of his life in Oxford, Mississippi-far removed from the intellectual centers of modernism and the writers who created it—William Faulkner (1897–1962) proved to be one of ...

Faulkner and Postmodernism

Since the 1960s, William Faulkner, Mississippi's most famous author, has been recognized as a central figure of international modernism. But might Faulkner's fiction be understood in relation to Thomas ...

A Cosmos of My Own

Contributions by Robert Hamblin, Panthea Reid Broughton, James B. Carothers, Louis Daniel Brodsky, Ellen Douglas, Charles Nilon, and François Pitavy

Reflecting developments in Faulkner criticism, these ...

Faulkner and the Southern Renaissance

It began in the 1930s in a powerful and elegant literature arising from a seemingly improbable place, the rural, agrarian South. This literary flowering, a proliferation of southern letters, is called ...

Faulkner

The international reputation and pervasive influence of William Faulkner upon world literature is the subject of the papers In this book.

At the Ninth Annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference, held ...

Faulkner and the Ecology of the South

In 1952, Faulkner noted the exceptional nature of the South when he characterized it as “the only really authentic region in the United States, because a deep indestructible bond still exists between ...

Faulkner and Religion

These ten essays from the annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference, held in 1989 at the University of Mississippi, explore the religious themes in William Faulkner's fiction. The papers published ...

Faulkner in America

With essays by Richard Godden, Catherine Gunther Kodat, Kathryn B. McKee, Peter Nicolaison, Charles A. Peek, Noel Polk, Hortense J. Spillers, Joseph R. Urgo, Linda Wagner-Martin, and Charles Reagan Wilson ...

Faulkner and the Natural World

Although he belonged to an American generation of writers deeply influenced by the high modernist revolt "against nature" and against the self-imposed limits of realism to a palpable world, William Faulkner ...

Faulkner and the Artist

Whatever the various roles he played and whatever his occasional claims that he was not at all a “literary man,” William Faulkner was in fact the most devoted of artists. He was absolutely dedicated ...