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Mary Wickes
I Know I've Seen That Face Before

By Steve Taravella

370 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 54 b&w photographs, filmography, index

978-1-60473-905-3 Cloth $40.00T

Cloth, $40.00

The full story of one of Hollywood's most accomplished character actresses

Moviegoers know her as the housekeeper in White Christmas, the nurse in Now, Voyager, and the crotchety choir director in Sister Act. This book, filled with never-published behind-the-scenes stories from Broadway and Hollywood, chronicles the life of a complicated woman who brought an assortment of unforgettable nurses, nuns, and housekeepers to life on screen and stage.

Wickes was part of some of the most significant moments in film, television, theatre, and radio history. On that frightening night in 1938 when Orson Welles recorded his earth-shattering "War of the Worlds" radio broadcast, Wickes was waiting on another soundstage for him for a rehearsal of Danton's Death, oblivious to the havoc taking place outside.

When silent film star Gloria Swanson decided to host a live talk show on this new thing called television, Wickes was one of her first guests. When Lucille Ball made her first TV appearance anywhere, Wickes appeared with her--and became Lucy's closest friend for more than thirty years. Wickes was the original Mary Poppins, long before an umbrella carried Julie Andrews across the rooftops of London. And when Disney began creating 101 Dalmatians, it asked Wickes to pose for animators trying to capture the evil of Cruella de Vil.

The pinched-face actress who cracked wise by day became a confidante to some of the day's biggest stars by night, including Bette Davis and Doris Day. Bolstered by interviews with almost three hundred people, and by private correspondence from Ball, Davis, Day, and others, Mary Wickes: I Know I've Seen That Face Before includes scores of never-before-shared anecdotes about Hollywood and Broadway. In the process, it introduces readers to a complex woman who sustained a remarkable career for sixty years.

Steve Taravella, Silver Spring, Maryland, and Rome, Italy, is a longtime journalist and communications specialist. He has received eleven writing awards, including the Dag Hammarksjold Award for Human Rights Advocacy in Journalism and the Society of Professional Journalists' Mark of Excellence Award.

370 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 54 b&w photographs, filmography, index